When the Queen stops eating, you do too.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @theroyalfamily.

Regardless of how swift an eater the Queen is, once she takes her last bite, the meal is over for everyone.

You also can’t turn your back on her.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @theroyalfamily.

No one turns their back on the Queen. If you ever get the honour of a conversation, once it’s over she’s always the first to leave.

When is the conversation over? 

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @queen_elizabeth_fanpage.

Staff members must cut off the conversation if the Queen moves her purse to her right arm, a subtle signal that it's time to move on. 

The crossed utensils signal

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @theroyalfamily.

If royals need to exit the room during dinner, they cross their utensils to let the staff know they aren’t done with their food yet. If they’re done with a meal, the utensils are placed at an angle, with the handles at the bottom right of the plate.

The Queen places her purse on the table.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @theroyalfamily.

Once the Queen’s purse is placed on the table at a dinner, said dinner must come to an end within five minutes.

Royal wedding rule: Myrtle in the bride's wedding bouquet

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @kensingtonroyal.

A long-standing tradition that has been practiced by every royal bride since Queen Victoria’s wedding, every royal wedding bouquet must contain a sprig of Myrtle. Symbolising love and marriage, the bouquets all come from Queen Victoria’s now 170 year old garden.

Another requirement: a group of young children

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Image: Courtesy of @katemiddletonphotos.

At the latest royal wedding, we saw a group of mini VIPs, from seven-year-old twins Brian and John Mulroney to three-year-old Princess Charlotte. This wasn’t a big surprise—it is common etiquette to have a crop of younglings at royal wedding parties.

Whatever the occasion, Monopoly is banned at family gatherings.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @queen_elizabeth_fanpage.

We aren’t sure how strictly this rule is kept, but Monopoly is forbidden amongst the royal family. Prince Andrew explained during a visit to Leeds Building Society that it was because the games would get too vicious.

Shellfish is also banned.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @theroyalfamily.

Members of British royalty can’t eat shellfish. As it is considered to have a high likelihood of causing food poisoning, shellfish is off the royal menu as a health precaution. After all, being blue-blooded doesn’t necessarily make you immune to illness.

Two heirs cannot travel together.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @kensingtonroyal.

In case of disaster, two heirs aren’t allowed to travel together. This means that once Prince George hits his twelfth birthday, he will be forbidden from flying in the same craft as his dad Prince William.

Royals are required to pack an all-black outfit whenever they travel.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @hrhduchesscatherine.

A rule with a slightly darker twist, every royal family member must remember to pack a funeral-appropriate outfit for their travels. This is so that in the case of a sudden death within the royal family, the travelling member would be dressed appropriately for a funeral once they return to England.

Royal women are required to wear hats to formal events.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @kensingtonroyal.

No wonder the hat game is so strong amongst female royalty.

But once it’s 6pm, hats are swapped with tiaras.

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @queen_elizabeth_fanpage.

If an indoor event is held from 6pm onwards, royal women replace their hats with tiaras. These must also be worn at a specific angle—tilted back down the head at 45 degrees.

Keep in mind though—tiaras are only for married Royalty.

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Image: Courtesy of @katemiddletonphotos.

Which means any woman seen at a royal event not wearing a tiara is single and possibly ready to mingle too.

Royal chin placement

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Image: Courtesy of IG: @katemiddletonphotos.

When posing for photos, royal women must make sure their chin is always parallel to the ground. There’s a pro-tip for you.

(Related: Meet The Woman Who Designed The Thai Dress At The Royal Wedding)

Tags: Royalty, Windsor, Etiquette, British Royalty, How To Be Royalty, Royal